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SWCD Watershed Program Grant Updates
Low-head dam removal coordinated with City of Williamsburg on East Fork Little Miami River resulted in 85 miles of free flowing river.
Low-head dam removal coordinated with City of Williamsburg, Ohio on East Fork Little Miami River resulted in 85 miles of free flowing river.

The SWCD Watershed Program (previously known as the Ohio Watershed Coordinator Grant Program) provides grants to Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) to enhance staffing capacity for water quality planning and implementation priorities on a watershed scale. More information regarding the program's background and grant application information is available here.

Active Grant Progress July 2016 - June 2019

Buckeye Lake Watershed

SPONSOR

Perry Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

Claire Donley, Watershed Coordinator

740-743-1616 ext. 4050

PRIORITIES

  • Nutrient management
  • Stream restoration
  • Wetland restoration
  • Watershed planning

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Buckeye Lake 2030
  • Buckeye Lake For Tomorrow (BLT)
  • Fairfield County Health Department
  • Fairfield Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Licking County Health Department
  • Licking Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Ohio Department of Natural Resources
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Perry County Health Department
  • Village of Hebron
  • Village of Millersport
  • Zane State College

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
HSTS Inspections 4 Inspections
Plant Cover/Manure Crop 332.2 Acres
Develop Brochure/Fact Sheet 1 Fact Sheet
Conduct Public Meeting 1 Meeting
Develop Press Release 1 Press Release
Create/Maintain Web Site 7 Updates
Conduct Chemical Sampling 1 Site
Conduct Nitrate Sampling (Water) 10 Sites

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Village of Millersport $450 Urban Runoff
Buckeye Lake Chamber of Commerce $450 Habitat Restoration
Total $900  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Surveyed sediment accumulation in Murphy's Run with Fairfield SWCD, Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), and United States Geological Survey staff to determine location and feasibility of an entrenched settling basin to capture sediment before entering Buckeye Lake. Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) has agreed to construct and maintain the structure. Designs and funding proposals are currently under development with assistance of ODA and ODNR.
  • Partnered with Licking SWCD to conduct a North Shore Urbanized Area Outfall Reconnaissance Inventory following EPA protocol to map all outfalls and conduct dry weather sampling. Catch basins and storm pipe locations were also mapped to assist with stormwater management planning and federal regulations. 
  • Coordinated the planting of over 300 trees in the watershed with assistance to Village of Millersport, Buckeye State Park, and Harbor Hills Country Club. 220 trees were distributed to students at Lakewood, Millersport, and Schein Bright Academy schools.
  • Assisted the Village of Millersport with rain garden design and installation, which was recommended as a response to property flooding. The village donated funds for plants and materials.
  • Conducted a radio interview with Connie Smith for 88.9 WLRY Farm Page program discussing issues in the Buckeye Lake watershed; and wrote an article for Buckeye Lake for Tomorrow regarding proper home sewage treatment system maintenance.
  • Partnered with Fairfield, Licking and Perry county health departments to develop a database of aeration home sewage treatment system locations in the watershed.
  • Toured the watershed with representatives of BLT and Fairfield SWCD to identify potential sites for agricultural practices to improve water quality including livestock exclusion from streams and grassed waterways. USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service officials will follow-up with landowners to recruit participation in the Environmental Quality Incentive Program.

 

Cahoon Creek & Lake Erie Watersheds

SPONSOR

Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

Jaimie Johnson, Watershed Coordinator

216-524-6580 ext. 1004

PRIORITIES

  • Watershed planning
  • Stream restoration
  • Riparian reforestation
  • Floodplain restoration

 

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Bay Village Green Team
  • City of Berea
  • City of Brunswick
  • Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport
  • Cleveland Metroparks
  • Cuyahoga Community College
  • Euclid Creek Watershed Partners
  • Lake Erie Nature and Science Center
  • NASA-Glenn Research Center
  • Rocky River Watershed Council
  • Willowughby Eastlake School of Innovation

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Restore Streambank Using Bio-Engineering 1700 Linear Feet
Restore Streambank by Recontouring or Regrading 150 Linear Feet
Remove/Treat Invasive Species 3.9 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 415 Trees
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 1.25 Acres
Restore Floodplain 990 Linear Feet
Restore Stream Channel 700 Linear Feet
Install In-stream Habitat Structures 7 Structures
Plant Wetland Species 1800 Plugs
Restore Natural Flow 50 Linear Feet
Develop Brochures/Fact Sheets 4 Brochure/Fact Sheet
Conduct Watershed Festival 1 Festival
Conduct Public Meetings 8 Meetings
Develop Press Releases 6 Press Releases
Create/Maintain Websites 3 Websites
Conduct Tours 2 Tours
Conduct Stream Clean-up 3 Clean-ups
Conduct Workshops 9 Workshops
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 1 Site Visits
Develop Newsletters 11 Newsletters
Conduct Chemical Sampling 34 Sites
Conduct Macroinvertebrate Sampling 13 Sites
Conduct Habitat (QHEI or HHEI) Sampling 13 Sites

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Western Reserve Land Conservancy $2,500 Education/Outreach
Western Reserve Land Conservancy $2,378 Education/Outreach
Central lake Erie Basin Collaborative $12,000 Urban Runoff
Total $16,878  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Cahoon Creek - Frontal lake Erie Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategy (NPS-IS) was submitted in February 2019 and officially accepted by Ohio EPA and Ohio Department of Agriculture on May 14, 2019. Development of the Baker Creek - West Branch Rocky River Watershed NPS-IS is underway. Cuyahoga SWCD has collected background information, performed watershed reconnaissance and data collection, and held two public meetings. Meetings with city officials to investigate project needs is forthcoming.

 

  • Coordinating with the City of Rocky River to develop a stream restoration project for Spencer Creek at Bradstreet's Landing, which is among the city's highest priorities. The project is included in the Cahoon Creek - Frontal Tributaries NPS-IS and grant proposals have been submitted to Ohio EPA Nonpoint Source and US Fish and Wildlife Restoration programs for funding.
  • 120 linear feet of stream was stabilized using a combination brush mattresses, live fascines, and live stakes at Healey Creek in Brunswick. 1,500 linear feet of stream was stabilized using 300 feet of live fascines and 1,200 live stakes at the Strongsville Backyard Habitat Preserve. 600 live stakes were added to 1,600 feed of stream bank and 800 wetland plugs were installed at Willowughby Eastlake School of Innovation. 75 trees and shrubs were added to 175 linear feet of riparian area at Hawken School in the Euclid River watershed. 500 linear feet of riparian area were planted with 1,000 wetland plugs and 98 shrubs and trees at the NASA Glenn Research Center within the Rocky River watershed. 98 trees and shrubs were planted along Abram Creek in a conservation easement held by Cuyahoga SWCD. 45 trees were planted along a cold water tributary to the East Branch of the Rocky River in the Cleveland Metroparks Hinckley Reservation as part of a National Fish & Wildlife Foundation-funded project.

 

Captina Creek Watershed

SPONSOR

Belmont Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2016

Brooke Sanderson, Watershed Coordinator

740-526-0027

PRIORITIES

  • Riparian protection
  • Stream restoration
  • Livestock exclusion

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Belmont Co. Health Department
  • Belmont County Farm Bureau
  • Captina Conservancy
  • Captina Creek Stream Team
  • Farm Bureau
  • JB Green Team
  • Monroe Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Muskingum Soil and Water Conservation District
  • USDA – Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Ohio Department of Natural Resources
  • Ohio Environmental Protection Agency
  • Ohio University - Voinovich School
  • Olney Friends School - Stream Team
  • ORSANCO
  • OSU Extension
  • Pease Township
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Washington Township
  • York Township

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Remove/Treat Invasive Species 12.5 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 75 Trees
Acquire Riparian Conservation Easements 338 Acres
Inspect Home Sewage Treatment Systems 1 Acres
Repair or Replace Home Sewage Treatment Systems 34 Inspections
Develop Nutrient Management Plans 225 Acres
Develop Whole Farm Management Plans 1843 Acres
Prescribed Conservation Grazing Practices 1205.9 Acres
Implement Conservation Tillage Practices 350 Acres
Install Alternative Water Supplies 15 Supplies
Install Heavy Use Feeding Pads 9 Pads
Install Livestock Exclusion Fencing 16,345 Linear Feet
Install Livestock Crossings 1 Crossing
Install Heavy Use Feeding Pads 4 Pads
Conduct Soil Tests 96 Tests
Install Roof Water Management Practices 1 Practices
Execute Landowner Cost-share 12 Agreements
Develop Brochures / Fact-sheets 2 Brochure / Fact-sheets
Conduct Watershed Festivals 1

Festival

Conduct Public Meetings 7 Public Meetings
Develop Press Releases 28 Press Releases
Create / Maintain Website 2 Website
Install Signs 5 Signs
Develop Displays 11 Displays
Conduct Tours 4 Tours
Conduct Stream Clean-ups 3 Clean-up
Conduct Field Days - landowner / manager 9 Field Days
Conduct Workshops 14 Workshops
Conduct Training 6 Training
Provide Technical Assistance to Groups 3 Groups
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 18 Site Visits
Develop Manuals 1 Manual
Develop Newsletters 8 Newsletters
Conduct Chemical Sampling 56 Sites
Conduct Macroinvertebrate Sampling 4 Sites
Conduct Nitrate Sampling 24 Sites

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Sam's Club Community Grant $850 Education/Outreach
Belmont Tourism $600 Education/Outreach
Gulfport Energy Corporation Donation $466 Education/Outreach
Western Reserve Land Conservancy $1,500 Monitoring & Evaluation
EQT $519 Habitat Restoration
Belmont County Tourism $450 Education
JB Green Team $1500 Agricultural Runoff
Ohio EPA $75,000 Stream Restoration
Total $80,885  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Washington Township Trustees continue to work with landowners adjacent to Crabapple Creek to relocate the bridge crossing. However, activity regarding Ohio EPA and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit applications is on hold until the final location of the bridge is determined. However, the local flood hazard development permit has been received. The Western Reserve Land Conservancy awarded a $6,000 Dominion Energy Watershed Spotlight Grant for the project. The U.S. EPA approved the Piney Creek Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategy (NPS-IS) watershed plan, which includes the Crabapple Creek stream crossing replacement project.
  • Redesigned the Joy Fork stream crossing project to reduce costs. Washington Township trustees have accepted this design, and the application process is underway for permits from Ohio EPA and Belmont County Flood Hazard. A $6,000 grant was received from the Western Reserve land Conservancy Dominion Energy Watershed Spotlight Program. Also coordinating with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and Trout Unlimited (TU) regarding the potential for a TU crew to assist with installation of articulated concrete block design. The watershed coordinator presented the scope of work to the Belmont SWCD Board of Supervisors and the Goshen Township Trustees.
  • Reviewed data collected by the Ohio EPA in 2008-2009 to determine the best approach to establish a consistent biological monitoring plan for the Captina Creek Watershed. Also assisted the Ohio Department of Natural Resources with monitoring macroinvertebrate communities within the watershed. Four sites were monitored over two, eight-hour field days, with one final site to monitor this field season. A Captina Creek Stream Team Appreciation Dinner was held in mid-June to recognize volunteer monitoring efforts. Ten were in attendance and six expressed interest in assisting with future macroinvertebrate monitoring in the watershed.
  • The watershed coordinator and Belmont SWCD agricultural technician have been on multiple site visits for livestock exclusion fencing in the watershed. One contract has been signed and the landowner plans to begin installing fencing soon. At the Belmont County meeting of the East Central Grazing Alliance, the watershed coordinator presented on the Captina Creek Livestock Exclusion Fencing Program and offered assistance to those interested after which the Belmont SWCD was approached by three additional landowners to discuss the program and set up site visits.
  • Hosted a hot air balloon event, "The Captina View from the Sky Festival." Several agencies supported the event with professionals on site to provide information and answer questions including ODNR divisions of Forestry and Oil and Gas, Captina Creek Conservancy, Brooks Bird Club, and the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
  • Hosted the "Bobolink Bonanza" event with partners Belmont Tourism, Brooks Bird Club, Dickinson Cattle Company, Cabela's, Country Sunshine 4-H Club, and Ohio Division of Natural Areas and Preserves to promote habitat protection and restoration programs. Over 60 visitors participated.
  • Partnered with Captina Conservancy to obtain a Spotlight Grant from the Western Reserve Land Conservancy and Dominion Gas for restoration of riparian zones and floodplains at three locations within the South Fork sub-watershed. Donations provided by the Captina Conservancy allowed for an additional 140 trees to be planted at one of the three sites.
  • Supported efforts of the Captina Creek Conservancy to develop a 30-minute documentary film about the Captina Creek Watershed.
 

East Fork Little Miami River Watershed 

SPONSOR

Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

Becky McClatchey, Natural Resources Specialist

513-732-7075

PRIORITIES

  • Watershed planning
  • Wetland restoration
  • Nutrient management
  • Farmland preservation
  • Stream restoration
  • Stormwater management

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Clermont Office of Environmental Quality
  • Ohio EPA
  • Ohio State University Extension
  • Village of Williamsburg
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Valley View Foundation

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Restore Streambank by Recontouring or Regrading 1000 Linear Feet
Plant Grasses in Riparian Areas 9 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 9 Acres
Remove Dams 1 Dam
Install Fish Passage and/or Habitat Structures 1 Structure
Restore Natural Flow 0.5 Miles
Acquire Riparian Conservation Easements 4 Acres
Conduct Public Meeting 3 Meetings
Create/Maintain Websites 1 Website
Develop Press Releases 1 Press Releases
Create/Maintain Web Sites 1 Website
Conduct Stream Clean-ups 2 Clean-ups
Develop Manual(s) 1 Manual
Conduct Tours 1 Tours
Provide Technical Assistance to Groups 1 Group
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 1 Site Visits
Conduct Chemical Sampling 1 Sites

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Ohio EPA - Ohio Environmental Education Fund $17,141 Outreach/Education
OKI - 2018 Targeted Water Quality Planning $25,000 Planning
Nonpoint Source Program Grant  (319) - Ohio EPA $85,000 Restoration
Total $127,141  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Coordinated a partnership between Village of Williamsburg and Ohio EPA to remove the Williamsburg Low-Head Dam in October 2018, which restored more than 85 miles of the East Fork Little Miami River to free-flowing condition. More than 60 volunteers participated in a mussel relocation event. Funding was provided through the Ohio EPA Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program for a total project cost of $674,911. Approximately 4 acres of riparian area was protected permanently with a conservation easement. The SWCD is also working with the Valley View Foundation to remove a low-head dam on the main stem of the East Fork Little Miami River in the Village of Batavia. The dam is slated for removal Fall 2019. $773,000 for this project are being provided through the Ohio EPA Water Resources Restoration Sponsor Program.
  • Began data assembly to revise the Lower East Fork Watershed Action Plan, first completed in December 2003. A county employee with a natural resources degree volunteered to help update the plan. The OKI Regional Council of Governments also agreed to map existing riparian corridors in Lower East Fork and other watersheds of interest, and help identify potential areas for restoration. A Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategy (NPS-IS) for Salt Run is currently under review by Ohio EPA and Ohio Department of Agriculture. The Gladys Run NPS-IS is also under development.
  • Obtained an Ohio Environmental Education Fund grant to help develop an Agriculture Conservation Menu (ACM) in partnership with Brown, Clinton and Highland SWCDs. A project website has been developed on the Clermont SWCD site to inform producers and landowners and recruit participation. Clinton SWCD has involved Wilmington College students and the Collegiate Farm Bureau members with two focus group meetings with local producers to gauge the type and level of resources sought for better management of agricultural systems and conservation practices. Information gathered from these meetings has guided the design and development of the ACM website.
  • Submitted a grant proposal to the US Fish & Wildlife Service to fund an Upper East Fork wetland treatment feasibility analysis, and the construction of an off-channel wetland at the site of the Village of Williamsburg’s old drinking water reservoir, which was drained as part of the low-head dam removal project. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers discussed potential alternative funding sources to complete the wetland feasibility study.
  • Partnered with the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service to apply and receive a second round of Environmental Quality Implementation Program funding for the East Fork watershed. Clermont SWCD and an interested producer have been discussing a concept plan to purchase a cover crop air seeder under a public/private partnership, and the SWCD received confirmation the project would be eligible as a Conservation Innovation Grant proposal.
  • Worked with the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana (OKI) Regional Council of Governments to submit a Healthy Watersheds grant application in February 2019 to help fund the extension of the "balanced growth" watershed-based planing framework throughout Clermont County with the intent to extend the analysis to other communities in the southwest Ohio area.  The application was well received, but funding was not awarded.  Clermont SWCD will discuss the possibility of continuing this effort with OKI as part of their water infrastructure planning efforts.
  • Working with two property owners along the Lower East Fork where approximately 4,300 feet on 20-25-foot banks are severely eroding. Site visits were hosted with potential funders and a grant proposal is in development with the assistance of the landowners and a local engineering firm. Plans are also underway to develop a stream "day-lighting" restoration project and wetland enhancement in Shor Park.

Frontal Lake Erie Tributary Watersheds

SPONSOR

Lake Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2019

Maurine Orndorff, Watershed Coordinator

440-350-2730

PRIORITIES

  • Restore stream and wetland habitat
  • Establish riparian buffers
  • Promote low impact development practices

More information will be provided after the first grant reporting period.

Grand Lake St. Mary's and St. Mary's River Watersheds

SPONSOR

Mercer Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

937-335-7645

PRIORITIES

  • Watershed planning
  • Nutrient management
  • Stream restoration
  • Wetland restoration

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Ag Solutions
  • Mercer County Health Department
  • USDA Farm Service Agency
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Wright State University Lake Campus

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Reconnect wetland to stream 3.75 Acres
Acquire Riparian Conservation Easements 13.55 Acres
Inspect HSTS 10 Inspections
Develop Nutrient Management Plans 4,688 Acres
Install Grassed Waterways 3.3 Acres
Construct Animal Waste Structures 3 Structures
Conduct Soil Testing 46 Tests
Conduct Public Meeting 1 Public Meeting
Develop Press Releases 2 Press Releases
Create Maintain Website 2 Websites
Install Signs 5 Signs
Conduct Tours 3 Tours

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Nonpoint Source Program Grant  (319) - Ohio EPA $484,908 Restoration
Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Grant and match $78,306 Restoration
Nonpoint Source Program Grant  (319) - Ohio EPA $362,369 Agricultural Runoff
Nonpoint Source Program Grant (319) - Ohio EPA $164,824 Agricultural Runoff
Ohio Lake Erie Commission $25,000 Planning
Total $1,115,407  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Secured Ohio EPA Nonpoint Source Program (319) funding for the West Branch Beaver Creek Stream Restoration Project. A full set of engineering plans and specifications have been developed and approved for the project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit has also been obtained. Construction of the new channel will begin as weather permits.
  • Secured Ohio EPA Nonpoint Source Program (319) funding for the Phosphorus Reduction Edge of Field Practice Plan. Mercer SWCD has signed up 89 acres into the double-cropping portion of the project. Three saturated buffer sites have been identified and will likely be installed Fall 2019.
  • Secured Ohio EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding for the Deerfield Wetland Construction Project. The project was completed in Fall 2018 and a tour of the site was held on May 2, 2019 with approximately 30 public officials participating.
  • Mercer SWCD is coordinating with Tetra Tech on development of the Yankee Run Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategy (NPS-IS), which is expected to be completed September 2019. A stakeholder outreach meeting was held on June 27, 2019 to discuss this and three other NPS-IS under development. A $25,000 grant was received from the Ohio Lake Erie Commission to develop NPS-IS for the Black Creek, Little Black Creek and Bliedorfer Ditch, all sub-watersheds of the St. Marys River watershed. Mercer SWCD and Ag Solutions also completed a NPS-IS for the Grand Lake St. Marys watershed, which was approved by Ohio EPA and Ohio Department of Agriculture.
  • Developed 16 engineering plans for conservation practices for installation within the watersheds with Conservation Reserve Program or Environmental Quality Incentive Program funding.

Jerome Fork Watershed

SPONSOR

Ashland Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2019

Erica White, Watershed Coordinator

419-281-7645

PRIORITIES

  • Agricultural nutrient management
  • Cover crops
  • Conservation tillage
  • Soil testing

More information will be provided after the first grant reporting period.

Killbuck Creek Watershed

SPONSOR

Holmes Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

Karen Gotter, Watershed Coordinator

330-600-3107

PRIORITIES

  • Nutrient management
  • Riparian restoration
  • Livestock exclusion
  • Stormwater management

 

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Boy Scouts
  • Holmes County Home
  • Holmes County Planning Department
  • Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Restore Streambank by Recontouring or Regrading 2070 Linear Feet
Plant Grasses in Riparian Areas 0.1 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 400 Trees
Restore In-Stream Habitat Structures 115 Linear Feet
Restore Natural Flow 233 Linear Feet
Plant Wetland Species 0.5 Acres
Plant Cover/Manure Crops 3563 Acres
Conduct Soil Testing 60 Tests
Execute Landowner Cost-Share Contracts 88 Cost-share Agreements
Develop Nutrient Management Plans 80 Acres
Install Grassed Waterways 0.47 Acres
Conduct Soil Tests 190 Tests
Develop Brochures/Fact-sheets 4 Brochures/Fact-sheets
Conduct Public Meetings 1 Public Meetings
Develop Press Releases 26 Develop Press Releases
Create Maintain Websites 1 Website
Conduct Stream Clean-ups 1 Clean-ups
Conduct Field Days - land owner/manager 1 Field Days
Provide Technical Assistance to Group(s) 3 Group
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 53 Site Visits
Conduct Chemical Sampling 120 Sites

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Debris Removal Program - MWCD $5,543 Habitat Restoration
Livestock Exclusion & Stream Protection Program - MWCD $10,000 Habitat Restoration
Ohio Environmental Education Fund - Ohio EPA $1300 Education/Outreach
Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District $210 Agricultural Runoff
Total $15,543  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Investigating a partnership opportunity for a potentially significant stream restoration project on a section of Rush Run, which is currently undergoing extensive aggradation* resulting in frequent flooding of county roads. While very costly for the county, the build up of sediment in the stream also causes water quality and stream habitat problems for aquatic wildlife. A preliminary design utilizing "natural stream restoration techniques" is under development. This approach will help ensure good stream stability, sediment transport, and habitat improvement while requiring less costly maintenance.

*Aggradation (or alluviation) is the term used in geology for the increase in land elevation, typically in a river system, due to the deposition of sediment. Aggradation occurs in areas in which the supply of sediment is greater than the amount of material that the system is able to transport. 

  • Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District awarded $10,000 to restore a stream through the Holmes County Home property with livestock exclusion fencing, watering systems, spring development, and two stream crossings. The project will also include a walking path adjacent to the stream, which will provide educational opportunity for visitors. The fencing and watering system components of this project are complete and the stream restoration will be completed when weather permits.
  • Coordinating with the Holmes County Planning Department to begin documenting stormwater controls and verifying their function. The SWCD provides educational materials to landowners visiting the office for stormwater permits, and utilizes the Collector App modified by the Homes County GIS director to inventory stormwater systems. All lot splits, replats and subdivisions in the county are reviewed by the SWCD, which results in filers receiving best management practice advice during construction. District staff also attend monthly meetings of the planning commission, which has been receptive to recommendations. Recent wet weather has provided opportunity to provide one-on-one consultation with property owners experiencing flooding or stormwater damage. As a result of such consultation a local vineyard operator voluntarily installed an underground stormwater collection basin to prevent runoff to his neighbor's property.
  • Participated in the Holmes County Engineer breakfast where interaction with 80 township trustees and other elected officials has resulted in improved awareness and follow-through with potential water quality issues. The SWCD's presentation provided examples of when community leaders should call the district.
  • Hosted a multi-county winter manure management update meeting for producers. Dr. Libby Dayton provided an overview of the On-Field Ohio! app for estimating erosion and phosphorus runoff risk, and Rob Clendening of Knox SWCD and Farm Bureau the OnMRK app for simplifying manure and fertilizer application record keeping. Follow-up from the meeting resulted in three farms adopting the OnMRK app on 1210 acres, and a producer adopting the On-Field Ohio! program on 500 acres. District staff continue to recruit new users and conduct one-on-one farmer follow-ups to check progress with use of the apps.

 

Little Beaver Creek Watershed

SPONSOR

Columbiana Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2016

Josh Emanuelson, Watershed Coordinator

330-332-8732

PRIORITIES

  • Livestock exclusion
  • Stream restoration
  • Low-head dam removal
  • Riparian restoration
  • Habitat restoration

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center
  • Columbiana County Health Department
  • Columbiana SWCD
  • ODNR Division of Forestry
  • ODNR Scenic Rivers 
  • Ohio EPA
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • U.S. EPA
  • Western Reserve Land Conservancy

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Dam Removal 2 Dams
Pasture and Hayland Planting 15.8 Acres
Acquire Riparian Conservation Easement 109 Acres
Inspect Home Sewage Treatment Systems 565 Inspections
Repair or Replace Home Sewage Treatment Systems 119 HSTS
Install Grassed Waterways 10 Acres
Install Roof Water Management Practices 2 Practices
Execute Landowner Cost-share Contracts 4 Contracts
Conduct Workshops 4 Workshop
Conduct Training 3 Training
Conduct Macroinvertebrate Sampling 31 Sites
Reduce Sediment Loading 26.6 Tons

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
Western Reserve Land Conservancy / Dominion Watershed Mini Grant $1,500 Restoration
Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership $5,000 Restoration
Total $6,500  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Lisbon Dam was removed from the Middle Fork of the Little Beaver Creek in February 2017 as a component of the Rutgers Organics / Nease Chemical site mitigation. With a donation from the Columbiana SWCD and participation from Village of Lisbon 125 trees and shrubs were purchased and planted to stabilize 750 feet of streambank. Sixteen volunteers assisted with the planting while learning the importance of riparian vegetation.
  • Discussed removal of the Pritchard Ave low-head dam with a village council member, and coordinating with engineers to estimate cost of construction in order to investigate funding options.
  • Development of a Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategy (NPS-IS) watershed plan is underway for the Brush Creek sub-watershed.
  • Discussed fencing with a new landowner and prepared maps and footage estimates to exclude livestock from approximately 3000 linear feet of stream within the Brush Creek sub-watershed. The project will also include two improved livestock stream crossings to prevent erosion. A funding application for the project was submitted to EPRI with tentative approval.
  • Livestock exclusion fencing will allow passive restoration of 3000 linear feet of Patterson Creek within the West Fork Little Beaver Creek sub-watershed. Efforts are underway with several agencies to acquire funding for the project. A second landowner is interested in installing livestock exclusion fence in the West Fork sub-watershed for which a conservation plan is being developed.
  • Initiated discussion with landowners to protect riparian corridor along the Middle Fork tributary. The Western Reserve land Conservancy protected 91 acres in Elk Run sub-watershed.
  • Coordination to replace a greenway bike trail culvert is ongoing. $66,000 has been raised for the project with the support of Ohio River Basin Fish Habitat Partnership, National Fish Passage Partnership, USFWS Partners program, ODNR, and a Western Reserve Land Conservancy/Dominion Energy Watershed Spotlight grant. Other funding opportunities are being investigated.
  • Hosted a canoe tour of the national and state scenic river section of the West Fork of the Little Beaver Creek. Local elected officials and agency leaders attended.
  • As a member of the Ohio Hellbender Partnership, assisted with maintenance of 14 "Hellbender Hut" artificial habitat structures, discussed hut molding with a local concrete supplier, and created a habitat sedimentation display for the Beaver Creek Wildlife Education Center.

Lower Auglaize River Watershed

SPONSOR

Paulding Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2019

Patrick Troyer, Watershed Coordinator

Daniel Foust, Watershed Coordinator

419-399-3841

PRIORITIES

  • Agricultural nutrient management
  • Stream and wetland restoration
  • Septic system upgrades
  • Soil health practices

More information will be provided after the first grant reporting period.

Sharron Creek Watershed

SPONSOR

Hamilton Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2019

Adam Lehmann, Watershed Coordinator

513-772-7645 ext. 15

PRIORITIES

  • Stormwater management
  • Stream and floodplain restoration

More information will be provided after the first grant reporting period.

Swan Creek Watershed

SPONSOR

Lucas Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2018

Joey Sink-Oiler, Watershed Coordinator

419-893-1966 ext. 1#

PRIORITIES

  • Nutrient management
  • Riparian restoration
  • Agricultural runoff prevention

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • Green Ribbon Initiative
  • Metroparks Toledo
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Oak Openings Regional Conservancy
  • Partners for Clean Streams
  • TLC Rain Garden Initiative
  • TLC Sustainabiliy Commission
  • TMACOG
  • Toledo Rotary Water Quality Committee

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Restore Streambank by Recontouring or Regrading 5280 Linear Feet
Remove/treat Invasive Species 50 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 40 Acres
Restore Stream Channel 1000 Linear Feet
Reconnect Wetland to Stream 8 Acres
Reconstruct & Restore Wetlands 15 Acres
Plant Wetland Species 20 Acres
Acquire Wetland Conservation Easements 27 Acres
Plant Cover/Manure Crops 2465 Acres
Install Erosion & Sediment Control Structures 3 Structures
Construct 2-stage Channel 300 Linear Feet
Install Grassed Waterways 3 Acres
Develop Displays 2 Displays
Develop Brochures/Fact Sheets 3 Brochures/Fact Sheets
Conduct Watershed Festivals 1 Festival
Create/Maintain Websites 4 Website
Conduct Tours 6 Tours
Conduct Tours via Canoe 8 Tours
Conduct Stream Clean-ups 8 Clean-ups
Conduct Field Days - land owner/manager 2 Days
Stencil Storm Drains 1 Drains
Conduct Workshops 8 Workshops
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 13 Site Visits
Develop Newsletters 14 Newsletters
Conduct Chemical Sampling 12 Sites

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Developed two project proposals for riparian habitat protection and restoration, one to update and add projects to the Upper Swan Creek Nonpoint Source Implementaiton Strategy (NPS-IS), and another to restore a 50-acre portion of farmland along a ditched tributary of Swan Creek. The proposals were submitted for funding to two grant programs. Although grants weren't awarded, the SWCD received feedback and was encouraged to reapply.
  • Developed a GIS map of Swan Creek watershed parcels within Lucas County containing riparian habitat to target outreach about protection and restoration programs. Three-hundred landowners adjacent to streams received letters with personalized property maps informing them of grant opportunities to restore riparian habitat and secure their land with easements. This resulted in a total of 115 acres of potential riparian restoration and protection land. The information was submitted to the Maumee Area of Concern Water Quality committee to be considered for Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding. The watershed coordinator also met with several elective officials to advocate for development a riparian habitat protection ordinance.
  • Initiated a pasture management program for horse owners. The SWCD brought a new stables owner to the district's EPA-certified horse manure composting facility, held the first on-site compost sale, and purchased a dump trailer to allow staff to haul manure from area farms and deliver finished compost. One-hundred cubic yards of horse manure were removed from Swan Creek watershed through operation of the Blue Creek Composting Facility.
  • Initiated the Ag BMP Incentive Program in the Heilman Ditch sub-watershed of Swan Creek, enrolling five producers for cover crops program and two for drainage water management. Two displays were developed as part of a peer-to-peer educational element of the program. The district certified and reimbursed costs for approximately 1000 acres of cover-crops, and was successful in applying for reprogrammed funds to cover an additional 500 acres. Two drainage control structures were designed and installed to manage runoff from 35 acres of farmland. An additional 8 drainage control structures are under design.

 

​Yellow Creek and Cross Creek Watersheds

SPONSOR

Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District

Grant Start: July 1, 2016

Aaron Dodds, Watershed Coordinator

740-264-9792

PRIORITIES

  • Riparian restoration & protection
  • Stream restoration & protection
  • Wetland restoration & protection
  • Low-head dam removal
  • Improve stream access

 

 

IMPLEMENTATION REPORTING PARTNERS

  • JB Green Team
  • Jefferson County Health Department
  • Jefferson County Sheriff
  • Ohio EPA
  • Ohio Department of Natural Resources
  • Ohio Hellbender Partnership
  • Ohio State University Extension
  • University of Steubenville
  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Western Reserve Land Conservancy

 

IMPLEMENTATION

Practices Values Units
Plant Grasses in Riparian Areas 5 Acres
Plant Prairie Grasses in Riparian Areas 2 Acres
Remove / Treat Invasive Species 8 Acres
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 91 Trees
Plant Trees or Shrubs in Riparian Areas 0.6 Acres
Restore Stream Channel 53 Linear Feet
Install In-stream Habitat Structures 46 Structures
Construct "self-forming stream" or "over-wide ditch" 67 Linear Feet
Restore Natural Flow 37 Linear Feet

Reconnect Wetland to Stream

0.83 Acres
Plant Wetland Species 2.25 Acres
Dispose of Debris 96 Cubic Yards
Install Slag Leach Beds 3 Beds
Install Limestone Channels 300 Linear Feet
Reclaim Abandoned Mine Drainage Wetlands 3 Acres
Construct Acid Mine Drainage Wetland 3 Acres
Acquire Riparian Conservation Easements 13 Acres
Inspect Home Sewage Treatment Systems 97 Inspections
Repair or Replace Home Sewage Treatment Systems 89 HSTS
Repair or Replace Alternative Home Sewage Treatment Systems 4 HSTS
Plant Cover / Manure Crops 399 Acres
Install Nitrogen Reduction Practices 24 Acres
Install Control Drainage System 74 Acres
Develop Nutrient Management Plans 5 Acres
Develop Whole Farm Management Plans 794 Acres
Implement Conservation Tillage Practices 22 Acres
Implement Prescribed & Conservation Grazing Practices 543 Acres
Install Heave Use Feeding Pads 5 Pads
Install Grassed Waterways 14 Acres
Install Sinkhole Stabilization Structures 1 Structures
Construct Animal Waste Storage Structures 1 Structures
Execute Landowner Cost-share Contracts 31 Cost-share Agreements
Develop Brochures / Factsheets 11 Brochures / Factsheets
Conduct Public Meeting 9 Public Meetings
Create / Maintain Website 5

Website

Develop Displays 4 Displays
Conduct Tours 3 Tours
Conduct Stream Clean-ups 4 Clean-ups
Conduct Field Days - land owner / manager 15 Days
Conduct Workshops 2 Workshops
Provide Technical Assistance to Groups 10 Groups
Deliver On-site Technical Assistance 16 Site Visits
Develop Newsletters 8 Newsletters

 

FUNDING LEVERAGED

Source Amount Purpose
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service $2,200 Riparian Planting
Ohio EPA $200,000 Septic Systems
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service $14,000 Restoration
Ohio Public Works $590,000 Habitat Protection
Total $804,022  

 

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Efforts continue to preserve property that has been idle for 68 years and containing high quality habitat in the Cross Creek watershed. Preservation and restoration of this property, tentatively referred to as "Hellbender Preserve," will have a significant value for protecting the water quality in Cross Creek watershed. Several meetings and negotiations have taken place.
  • Remained an active participant with the Ohio Hellbender Partnership, and continued efforts to preserve a population of the Eastern Hellbender salamander. This includes working with the local university to construct artificial housing for the Hellbender salamanders and place them in streams. The units are made in Jefferson County, which has added benefits of increased awareness and a boost for the local economy. Fifteen of the artificial housing units have been purchased and are being installed in the stream.
  • Working with the Village of Salineville on an initial plan to remove the Riley Run low-head dam, which includes a perpetual conservation easement to protect the riparian corridor and 15 acres of surrounding landscape adjacent to the dam owned by the village. The village would like to have the dam removed, however, the village is not able to provide financial support for the project. Meetings have been held with Rosebud Coal Mining, who is working with an environmental consultant to determine project cost. Potential project funding has been discussed with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • Developing a plan to restore a recreational access point on Yellow Creek near Bergholz that contains 13 acres of property, and in negotiations with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding funding for riparian restoration. Discussions have been initiated with property owners to add primitive kayak launches on their properties, which will also include riparian plantings and stream bank stabilization.
  • Partnering with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on bat monitoring in abandoned tunnels and caverns within Jefferson County.
  • Facilitating the donation of a 100-acre property to the Jefferson SWCD to be used as a conservation site and outdoor classroom. The property contains a half mile of Cedar Lick Creek, several minor unnamed tributaries and a moderately sized wetland. A Clean Ohio Greenspace grant of $590,000 was awarded for this project.

 

Cumulative Fiscal Status and Benefits

Thanks to funding from the Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission, Ohio EPA, and Ohio Department of Natural Resources (divisions of Mineral Resources Management, Wildlife, and Office of Coastal Management) $13 million has been awarded to support grants statewide 2001 through 2019.

 

Program Revenue 2001-2019

Ohio EPA $4,567,000
Soil and Water Conservation $4,565,000
Mineral Resources Management $1,897,000
Division of Wildlife $1,326,000
Office of Coastal Management $729,000
Total $13,084,000

 

During the same period, watershed coordinators working with stakeholders and partner agencies have leveraged $116.2 million for projects to improve and protect the water quality in their watersheds. The graphs provided below illustrate total leveraged funds by source and project type. The data used to develop this summary information is available for download from this page.

 

Funding Leveraged by Source 2001-2019

 

Funding Leveraged by Project Type 2001-2019