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Tyler's Law Impacts and New Requirements
Tyler's Law Impacts and New Requirements

On November 9, 2020, rules adopted pursuant to HB 189, more commonly referred to as Tyler’s Law, went into effect. The Ohio Department of Agriculture adopted these rules to establish increased safety measures for amusement rides. These rules adopt new ASTM standards, collect information regarding the storage or use of rides outside of Ohio, and specify the frequency of inspections and number of inspectors who will perform those inspections.

Here is a breakdown of the new requirements and the impact to ride operations:

Fatigue and Corrosion Review:

OAC 901:9-1-4.1 categorizes rides and establishes protocols for ride owners to complete fatigue and corrosion reviews and inspections, based on category of ride.  The categories are as follows:

  • "Low Intensity Rides": All kiddie rides, carousels, go karts, and inflatable devices. For the purpose of this rule, kiddie rides are all rides that are primarily designed for children 48 inches and under.
  • "Intermediate Rides": All rides that are not classified as low intensity rides, towers, or roller coasters pursuant to this rule.
  • "Towers": Any amusement ride, other than a roller coaster, whose main body components exceed twenty feet in height.
  • "Roller Coasters": Any ride licensed as a roller coaster pursuant to section 1711.53 of the Revised Code and whose main body components exceed fifty feet in height.

Owners of intermediate rides, towers, and roller coasters are required to complete the following. These requirements take effect April 1, 2021 for all intermediate rides:

  • Ensure all rides meet the manufacturer's minimum requirements for inspection and testing.
  • Annually perform a complete visual inspection of a ride's structure including removing access panels where possible to do so. Special attention shall be given to structural members and their connections for signs of fatigue or corrosion.
    • If fatigue or corrosion are found, the owner will discuss the findings with the ride's manufacturer and implement mitigation strategies.
    • For orphaned amusement rides, the owner shall seek the consultation of a registered professional engineer in good standing. If fatigue or corrosion are found, the owner will discuss the findings and implement mitigation strategies as recommended by the registered professional engineer.

Documentation of the visual inspection and the findings shall be made available to ODA for review. Additionally, the documentation shall be maintained for the life of the ride and transferred to any subsequent owner. The ride owner shall ensure compliance with the mitigation strategies, if any, pursuant to the recommendations made by either the manufacturer or registered professional engineer where applicable.

 

Out of State Storage/Operation:

For all portable rides, all ride operators must submit a list of all locations and dates where the portable ride was either stored for a period longer than thirty (30) days or operated outside of the state of Ohio.

Beginning on January 1, 2021, owners of portable rides shall submit these records for the previous calendar year.

 

Inspection Frequency & Number of Inspectors:

Based on the ride categories discussed above, OAC 901:9-1-4.2 establishes the minimum number of times a ride must be inspected each year as well as the number of inspectors that must perform that inspection.

Ride Category

No. of Inspections

No. of Inspectors (Initial)

No. of Inspectors (Supplemental)

Low Intensity

1

1

1

Intermediate

2

2

1

Towers

2

2

2

Roller Coasters

2

2

2

 

Itinerary Changes

When submitting itineraries, you will now be prompted to submit the number of rides and their category anticipated at the designated event. This data is necessary so that ODA can schedule an adequate number of inspectors to complete each inspection.

If you have any questions regarding this information, please contact the Division of Amusement Ride Safety at Ride.Safety@agri.ohio.gov or 614.728.6280.